STEPS (the)

iDefinition of Steps: a set of guiding principles outlining a course of action for recovery from addiction, compulsion, or other behavioral problems.
Synonyms of Steps: twelve steps, AA, alcoholics anonymous, narcotics anonymous, self-help group/s, etc,

These notes are from recovery in AA and/or related 12 step programs.
Readers are encouraged to click external links for more detail.
We hope you find them helpful.
Love in fellowship.

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The Steps keep us from suicide; The Traditions, from homicide.
The Steps protect me from myself; the Traditions protect AA from me. | More…

The first step identifies the problem.
The second step identifies the solution.
The third step identifies the action.

The steps lead to an awakening of a spiritual nature.
This awakening is evidenced by changes in our lives. –Just for Today | More…

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The Steps

Step 1–show Up
Step 2–Look Up
Step 3–Give up
Steps 4 & 5–‘fess up
Step 6 & 7–Straighten Up
Steps 8 & 9–Make Up
Steps 10 & 11–Keep Up
Step 12--Suit Up, Show Up, and Speak Up.

The Steps
Steps 1-3: Give Up
Steps 4 & 5: Own Up
Steps 6-9: Clean Up
Steps 10-12: Grow Up

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The Twelve Steps seem to embody five principles.
The first step is the membership requirement step.

The second, third, and eleventh steps are the spiritual steps of the program.
The fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and tenth steps are the personal inventory steps.

The eighth and ninth steps are the restitution steps.
The twelfth step is the passing on of the program, or helping others, step. So the five principles are membership requirement, spiritual basis, personal inventory, restitution, and helping others. 24 Hours | More…

The Twelve Steps are a formula for healing. We access this healing power by working the Steps and by allowing them to work on us.

How long do we have to go to meetings? We go until we “get the program.” We go until the program “gets us.” Then we keep on going and growing. –The Language of Letting Go/Melody Beattie | More…

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The Twelve Steps give us a strong dose of real values, the kind that help us live in harmony with ourselves and those around us. –Just For Today | More…

The Twelve Steps are our plan of living.
We must have a plan. Without one, we waste our energy.

Recovery brings us the Twelve Steps, and each Step gives us direction and wisdom. Each Step builds on the progress we made from the Step before it. Sometimes we follow the plan well. Sometimes we think we can do better on our own. –Keep It Simple | More…

The Twelve Steps are a path to spiritual awakening. This awakening takes the form of a developing relationship with a loving Higher Power. Each succeeding step strengthens that relationship. –Just For Today | More…

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The steps offer a gentle program of change, one step at a time. No single step is so frightening that we can’t work it, by itself. As we apply the steps to our lives, we experience a change that frees us. –Just For Today | More…

The Twelve Steps offer guidance for an easier way through life. We don’t have to knock ourselves out over these Steps; all we have to do is follow the direction they give us. –Night Light/Amy E. Dean | More…

All things have their seasons. All thoughts are real.
We must think to cause action and each action creates results.

Big visions require many thoughts. It takes a series of thoughts to create a series of actions. A series of actions creates a series of results. These results are what makes vision become real.

If we are here to serve the Creator then we can expect to be accomplishing big visions. How do we do this? One step at a time. –Elders Meditations | More…

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We learned that we had to fully concede to our innermost selves that we were alcoholics.
This is the first step in recovery. –Big Book. p.30 | More…

It is through the continuous work of the Steps and the life in the Fellowship that I’ve learned to see that there is truly a better way into which I am being guided. –Daily Reflections | More…

Taking the actions for each Step as outlined in AA allows two things to occur, simultaneously. The first thing is that my ego is deflated and my personality is changed. The second thing that working the Steps does is, nourish my innermost self. –Unknown

Steps in a word
Step 1: Honesty
Step 2: Hope
Step 3: Faith
Step 4: Courage
Step 5: Integrity
Step 6: Willingness
Step 7: Humility
Step 8: Compassion
Step 9: Love
Step 10: Perseverance
Step 11: Spiritual Awareness
Step 12: Service

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Trust in God, Clean house, and Work with others. –Grapevine

Steps 1-3 are “Trust God,”
Steps 4-10 are “Clean House,”
Steps 11-12 are “Help Others.” –Barefootsworld  | More…

Step-ups
Steps  1 – 3  – Give Up: Surrender, Faith, Commitment
Steps  4 – 6  – Clean Up: Examination, Confession, Readiness
Steps  7 – 9  – Make Up: Humility, Willingness, Forgiveness
Steps 10 – 12 – Keep Up: Maintenance, Prayer/Obedience, Outreach/Example

Here’s an overview of the Quick steps | More…

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The Tablemate was an early A.A. set of beginners lessons entitled “Alcoholics Anonymous:  An Interpretation of the Twelve Steps,” put out in the form of a little pamphlet.

It was (and still is) the most successful set of A.A. beginners lessons ever devised. It breaks the twelve steps down into four groups, which are studied over a period of four weeks:

Discussion No. 1. / The Admission.  Step No. 1.
Discussion No. 2. / The Spiritual Phase.  Steps 2, 3, 5, 6, 7 and 11.
Discussion No. 3. / The Inventory and Restitution.  Steps No. 4, 8, 9 and 10.
Discussion No. 4. /  The Active Work.  Step No. 12.

This pamphlet was printed and published by A.A. groups all over the United States, where it became known under a variety of local names:  The Tablemate, the Table Leader’s Guide, the Detroit pamphlet, the Washington D.C. pamphlet, the Seattle pamphlet, and so on.

The basic text always remained the same. Hindsfoot | More…

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We take Steps Four and Five in order to sort out our thoughts, getting rid of those that depress our spirit. In Step Ten, we continue a daily mental housecleaning so that residues of resentment and discouragement are not allowed to accumulate. Then we go on to Step Eleven for an infusion of the kind of thinking that nurtures the person we want to become. –Inner Harvest/Elisabeth L. | More…

I can only live the Twelve Steps if, at some point, I’ve taken the actions they require under the guidance of a sponsor. I have to follow the principles myself, with help and support, to become spiritually fit. –JoAnn Campbell-Rice | More…

The Twelve Steps help us to recognize the teachers in our lives. They help us clear away the baggage of the past and free us to accept and trust the will of God. Each Day a New Beginning | More…

It’s true that the only requirement for membership in AA is a desire to stop drinking. But if you absolutely want a better life, well, hmmm … How’s this? Working the Steps with a sponsor is a really good idea. –“A Really Good Idea”, Spring City, UT, November 2003 / Grapevine | More…

What is involved in taking the entire AA program, as the early AAs gave it to us, is not the prospect of turning into some sort of repulsive goody-goody. It’s the threat of being truly alive, aware, and perhaps even ecstatic. –Vt, October 1965/”The Threat of the Twelve Steps” / Grapevine | More…

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How do I take Twelve Steps in A.A.?
How do I work those Steps?

How do people practice the Steps? Do we ‘TAKE’,’ ‘WORK’, ‘DO’, ‘APPLY’, ‘PRACTISE’, ‘COMPLETE’, ‘FOLLOW’, the Twelve Steps?????

Back in the ’40s, when Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob first published AA’s Big Book, they encouraged their fellow alcoholics to speed through all 12 steps during their first 30 days of sobriety. “Most alcoholics don’t respond well to over-thinking,” Wilson said.

But finding a Higher Power, admitting all your flaws and apologizing to everyone you’ve hurt during your wasted past is often a painful process for even the most committed Big Bookers, who sometimes take months or years to complete the steps.

AA’s Twelve Steps are a group of principles, spiritual in their nature, which, if ‘practised’ as a way of life, can expel the obsession to drink and enable the sufferer to become happily and usefully whole — 12 & 12 Forward (1953) | More…

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Keep it Simple, BUT not simple-minded. We can “Keep it Simple” by building our lives around the principles of the Twelve Step program. –Walk In Dry Places/Mel B. | More…

I remember my sponsor’s answer when I told him that the Steps were ‘suggested.’ He replied that they are ‘suggested’ in the same way that, if you were to jump out of an airplane with a parachute, it is ‘suggested’ that you pull the ripcord to save your life.

He pointed out that it was ‘suggested’ I practice the Twelve Steps, if I wanted to save my life. –Daily Reflections | More…

The spiritual ideas of the Society (A.A.) were codified for the first time in the Twelve Steps, and ‘the application’ of these Steps to the alcoholic’s dilemma was made clear. — 12 & 12 Forward (1953) | More…

Now we think you can take it! Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as your Program of Recovery: (1938 Original Manuscript of Alcoholics Anonymous.) | More…

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Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as a program of recovery: –Big Book p.59 (Fourth Edition original English version) | More…

Here are the steps we have followed and that we propose as a recovery program —Notre Methode (translation from Big Book p.66 French version) | More…

Back to Basics urges alcoholics to complete all of AA’s 12 steps in sixteen hour-long sessions a month. (Back to Basics) | More…

Three Ways of Working the Twelve-Step Program Gresham’s Law and Alcoholics Anonymous (by a forty-three year member of Alcoholics Anonymous)

There are three ways to practice the Twelve-Step Program.

(1) The strong, original way — proved powerfully and reliably effective over seventy-two years. (2) A medium way — not so strong, not so safe, not so sure, not so good, but still effective. And… (3) a weak way, which turns out to be really no way at all but literally a heresy, a false teaching, a twisting and corruption of what the founders of Alcoholics Anonymous clearly stated the Program to be. –Gresham’s Law | More…

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Take the Steps with the Big Book, A.A. History,  and the Good Book at Your Side. You can learn what the “Twelve” ideas were in Bill Wilson’s mind, in the practices of the pioneers in Akron, in the so-called “six steps” in Bill’s word-of-mouth summaries, in the journal kept by Dr. Bob’s wife Anne Smith, in the teachings and writings of Bill’s spiritual mentor Rev. Samuel Moor Shoemaker, Jr. of Calvary Church in New York, in the life-changing program of the Oxford Group from which A.A. sprang, and in the Bible – from which all of the basic ideas were borrowed.

Early Six-step Versions of the Steps The Six Steps: Prior to the writing of the Big Book, A.A. operated with a kind of loosely stated Six Step system.

Below is a short version of those Six Steps which Bill W. wrote out in his own hand many years later, in April 1953, probably for Father Ed Dowling. This document was brought to our knowledge by Biker Gary G. (Sparta, New Jersey), who has a copy in his collection.

Below is a copy of the original, which is in the New York A.A. Archives. It reads:

For Ed – 

  1. Admitted hopeless
  2. Got Honest with self
  3. Got honest with another
  4. Made Amends
  5. Helped other without demand
  6. Prayed to God as you understand Him

Ever

Apr/1953  Bill W. –Hindsfoot.com | More…

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Original AA steps
More still, you will see how to take the Steps in accordance with the instructions in A.A.’s Big Book, how to understand each Step in terms of its historical roots, and how you can understand the Steps far better if you see how they fit into the A.A. spiritual concepts of “finding God,” “reliance on the Creator,” “establishing a relationship with God,” and practicing the principles of the Bible as they found their way into the principles of the 12 Step program.

Contents for ‘Take the Twelve Steps with the Big Book, A.A. History, and the Good Book at Your Side

Introduction

Chap. 1:  Begin Your Step Study by Reviewing the Original Akron Program and Learning How A.A. Really Began

Chap. 2:  Begin Your Study of the Steps by Looking First at the Bible and at Each Step’s Known Bible Origins

Chap. 3:  With the Bible Origins in Mind, Study Each Step to Learn the Basic Ideas It Contains from the Oxford Group

Chap. 4:  Once You Have Learned the Bible Sources and the Oxford Group Ideas, Then Study Each Step, Observing How Closely It Parallels the Language of America’s Oxford Group Leader, Sam Shoemaker

Chap. 5:  Then See How Much of the Bible Material, Oxford Group Ideas, and Shoemaker’s Writings Were Being Taught in Early A.A. in Anne Smith’s (Dr. Bob’s Wife’s) Writings

Chap. 6:  Read Carefully This Study and Critique of What Bill W. Claimed Were Six Steps—Six “Word-of Mouth” Ideas Already in Place

Chap. 7:  Consider the Steps in Company with the Three Bible Parts Dr. Bob Called “Absolutely Essential” Lest Some Highly Important Spiritual Resources of the A.A. Program be forgotten

Chap. 8:  Studying the Steps Mindful of Other Major Contributing Literature

Chap. 9:  Start Taking Your Steps Precisely as Directed by the Big Book—Then Make Your Judgments

Chap. 10: Consider This Possible Biblical View of the 12 Steps Using History as Your Guide

–Twelve Steps For You | More…

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More about The Steps…
An AA friend recently summarized the Steps in a way that gives a good, quick overview of the spiritual principles embodied in them:

1. Admission of powerlessness.
2. Reliance on a Higher Power.
3. Total surrender to God.
4. Moral inventory.
5. Admission of the exact nature of our wrongs.
6. Commitment to total change.
7. Prayer for total wholeness.
8. Total willingness to amend.
9. Making amends where possible.
10. Continuing inventory.
11. Prayer and meditation, leading to improved conscious contact with God.
12. Spiritual awakening, carrying the message, and practicing the principles in all our affairs.

When the Steps are epitomized like this, you can clearly see that they aim, not at normalcy, but at full spiritual regeneration at a life lived one day at a time in conscious contact with God.

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There is no prior requirement of purity of life or advancement of learning.
Just a willingness to admit personal defeat and a sincere desire to change.

AA existed for four full years before the Steps were put in their final written form.
During that time there was a Program, and it was sobering up alcoholics.

It consisted of two parts: a six-step word-of-mouth Program, and the Four Absolutes
absolute honesty, absolute purity, absolute unselfishness, and absolute love — (taken over from the Oxford Group out of which AA was born.)

In those early days of AA (1935-1939) there was no talk of suggestions. The word-of-mouth Program, were regarded by all the older members as directives, as indispensable essentials, and were passed on to newcomers as such.

When the Twelve Steps were first being formulated by Bill and Dr. Bob  and an editorial committee from Akron and New York Bill, Dr. Bob, and the entire committee conceived of the Steps as instructions, not as suggestions.

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The Big Book was published in April of 1939, and in it the ‘suggestions-only’ approach to the Steps was disseminated for the first time. Members in Cleveland eased up a bit on the idea that all the principles should be practiced all the time by all the members.

More and more emphasis began to be placed on the fact that the Steps were to be considered as suggestions only. At this time, and through this set of circumstances, the “cafeteria-style” — take-what-you-like-and-leave-the-rest-out — approach to the Twelve Steps came into practice.

At first this seemed like an unmixed blessing.
Strong AA was the original, undiluted dosage of the spiritual principles.

Strong AAs took all twelve of the Steps — and kept on taking them. The medium AAs started off with a bang, pretty much like the strong AAs, except they hedged or procrastinated a bit on parts of the Program that they feared or did not like — maybe the God Steps, maybe the inventory Steps, depending on their particular nervousness or dislikes.

The weak AAs were a varied lot. Common to the weak approach everywhere was that it left out big chunks of the Program totally and permanently.

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Sometimes it was the God Steps, sometimes the inventory Steps, often both. The fact is that only the Strong AA members were practicing the Program as it had been laid out in the Big Book.

Granting that the medium and weak AAs had every right as AA members to practice the principles any way they wanted to (including hardly any at all), since the Steps were “suggestions only” — still, the way the first members had done it, and the way the Big Book had recorded it, was the Strong AA members way.

Weak AA, in very many cases, really doesn’t work. Weak AA brings about a far less profound life alteration than Strong AA does.

In many cases the change which Weak AA produces is not enough to crack the alcoholic pattern. What Weak AA really amounts to is merely a form of cheating on AA.

The great discovery that launched AA in the first place was this: the alcoholic must somehow be rocketed into a state way beyond abstinence , he must achieve a real spiritual conversion — he must achieve an utterly new relationship with God.

Then permanent abstinence will automatically occur as a blessed and life-saving by-product. That was how the authors of the Big Book saw that it would have to happen with everyone. –Gresham’s Law | More…

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Our early days in AA can be compared to being a passenger on the Titanic. In Step One we realized we were on the Titanic and that we were doomed.

In Step Two we spotted a lifeboat.
And in Step Three we took our seats in the lifeboat. –One Day at a Time | More…

The Twelve Steps gently lead us toward a spiritual awakening. Do we remember that, no matter how deep our despair or how great our joy, the God of our understanding is with us? –Just For Today | More…

As we work the steps, we’re bound to discover some basic truths about ourselves. As we attain a new understanding of ourselves.

We’ll want to adjust our behavior accordingly.
We want to be genuine examples of who we are. –Just For Today | More…

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Twelve Steps simplified

  1. Alcohol will kill me.
  2. There’s a power that wants me to live.
  3. Do I want to live or die? (if you want to die, stop here)
  4. Write about how I got to where I am.
  5. Tell another person all about me (let God listen).
  6. Want to change.
  7. Ask a power greater than me to help me change.
  8. Write down who I’ve hurt.
  9. Fix what I can without hurting anyone else.
  10. Accept that I’m human and will screw up. Fix it immediately.
  11. Ask a power greater than me to show me how to live.
  12. Keep doing 1 through 11 and pass it on. | More…

When we work the Twelve Steps to the best of our ability, we find that we can become the type of people who are capable of finding employment, sustaining loving relationships, and helping others. –Just For Today | More…

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In twelfth-step work, the fourth thing is conversion. Conversion means change.
Prospects must learn to change their way of thinking.

Until now, everything they’ve done has been connected with drinking. Now they must face a new kind of life, without liquor.

They must start each day by asking their Higher Power for the strength to stay sober. This conversion to belief in a Higher Power comes gradually, as they try it and find that it works.

Discipline of yourself is absolutely necessary before the power of God is given to you. All your life is a preparation for more good to be accomplished when God knows that you are ready for it.

So keep disciplining yourself in the spiritual life every day. Learn so much of the spiritual laws that your life cannot again be a failure. –24Hours | More…

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We stop serving our disease, and begin serving God and others. The Twelve Steps are the key to transforming our lives. –Just For Today | More…

The Twelve Steps are a spiritual way of living, meaning honest thinking, not wishful thinking, open mindedness, a willingness to try and a faith to accept. They mean patience, tolerance and humility, and above all the belief that a Power greater than myself can help. Big Book / It Might Have Been Worse | More…

To stay in this program, we need to accept that we have an illness.
We need to accept that we were out of control.

And we need to accept that we need others and they need us.
Many of us get into trouble when we don’t accept that we need others.

This is why helping others is so important.
It teaches us that we need others, and others need us. –Keep It Simple | More…

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Twelve Steps – Twelve Beautiful Gifts
For each step there is a principle. I believe that with each step I received a gift.

STEP ONE: We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.
(I received a silver mirror that revealed reality and truth when I looked into it.)

STEP TWO: Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
(I received a stone to put in my pocket. It had the word “hope” engraved on its face and was comforting in my hand when I held it.)

STEP THREE: Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
(I received a pair of wings for my soul.)

STEP FOUR: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
(I received a candle to search out my hidden shame.)

STEP FIVE: Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
(I received a beautiful note that said, “Welcome to the human race. We are so glad to have you back.”)

STEP SIX: Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
(I received a dove to put my burdens upon and set it free.)

STEP SEVEN: Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
(I received a small box engraved with the words, “I will place my problems here.”)

STEP EIGHT: Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
(I received a map that led to the future.)

STEP NINE: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
(I received an eraser to correct the mistakes I had made.)

STEP TEN: Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
(I received a scale to weigh and balance my actions – and to measure my growth.)

STEP ELEVEN: Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
(I received a communication device able to span all doubt and prejudice.)

STEP TWELVE: Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

One day at a time… the fountain I received, bubbles eternal hope and new ideas. –One Day At A Time | More…

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What does it mean to work a Step?
Think about it. Meditate on it.

Instead of focusing on the confusion, the problems, or the situation causing our despair or rage, focus on the Step. Think about how that Step might apply. Hold on to it.

Hang on as tightly as we hang on to our confusion or the problem. The Steps are a solution. They work. –The Language of Letting Go/Melody Beattie 28/11 | More…

Working the Twelve Steps teaches us to accept ourselves and our lives. Spiritual principles like surrender, honesty, faith, and humility help relieve us of the burden of our past mistakes.

Our attitude changes with the application of these principles in our daily lives.  Self-acceptance grows as we grow in recovery. –Just For Today | More…

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The heart of the suggested program of personal recovery is contained in Twelve Steps describing the experience of the earliest members of the Society:

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

These are the action Principles of the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. As long as we use these principles each day, we receive the gift of sobriety. | More…

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The Twelve Steps and Biblical references…..

Step 1: We admitted we were powerless over alcohol … that our lives had become unmanageable.
Biblical Reference: I know that nothing good lives in me, that is, in my sinful nature. For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out.” (Romans 7:18)

Step 2: Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
Biblical Reference: “… my grace is sufficient for you, for my POWER is made perfect in weakness.” (2 Corinthians 12:9) …for it God Who works in you to will and act according to His good purpose.. (Phil. 2:13)

Step 3: Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of GOD as we understood Him.
Biblical Reference: …. If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.” (Luke 9:23**)

Step 4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
Biblical Reference: “Let us examine our ways and test them, and let us return to the Lord.” (Lamentations 3:40)

Step 5: Admitted to GOD, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
Biblical Reference: “Therefore confess your sins to each other and pray for each other so that you may be healed.” (James 5:16)

Step 6: Were entirely ready to have GOD remove all these defects of character.
Biblical Reference: “If you are willing and obedient, you will eat the best from the land.” (Isaiah 1:19)

Step 7: Humbly asked Him to remove all our shortcomings.
Biblical Reference: “Humble yourselves before the Lord, and He will lift you up.” (James 4:10)

Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed and became willing to make amends to them all.
Biblical Reference: “Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to your brother; then come and offer your gift.” (Matthew 5:23, 24**)

Step 9: Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
Biblical Reference: Give and it shall be given you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.” (Luke 6:38**)

Step 10: Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it.
Biblical Reference: “For by the grace given me I say to every one of you: Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the measure of faith GOD has given you.” (Romans 12:3)

Step 11: Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with GOD as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will, and the power to carry that out.
Biblical Reference: “May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O Lord, my Rock and my Redeemer.” (Psalm 19:14)  “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly…” (Col. 3:16)

Step 12: Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and practice these principles in all our affairs.
Biblical Reference: “Brothers, if someone is caught in a sin, you who are spiritual should restore him gently. But watch yourself, or you also may be tempted. Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfil the law of Christ.” (Galatians 6:1-2)

**The words of Christ  — Alcoholics Victorious (Founded 1948) | More…

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Five Stages of Surrender Within the Twelve Steps | More…

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